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Meet Our 2016 Interns

Updated: Oct 11, 2018


This Summer, the Pocock Foundation welcomed three new interns. It is easy for interns to get blended in to the work environment, but these hard workers bring a strong will to succeed and an abundance of energy to the Foundation and the respective boathouses they operate in. They took a few minutes of their time to answer some questions so we could learn a little bit more about them. If you see them around, be sure to say “Hello”!


Will Lytle (left), Daniel Rowbotham (center), and Kam Coon (right)

 Will Lytle – Pocock Rowing Center – Communications Intern


Give us your life story in no more than 2 sentences.

I was born and raised in Seattle and introduced to rowing in High school, resulting in end of my life/my life beginning anew. 8 years of rowing later and a degree in Communications from UW, I am still in love with my city, my sport and try to convince other people how awesome rowing is!


What brought you to the Pocock Foundation?

I am eternally grateful to the sport of rowing and the community at large for changing me into a more well-rounded person. Rowing has formed the basis of who I am and how I carry myself as an adult. I can’t think of better way to give back then to work with an organization that introduces an amazing sport to youth around the Seattle area and hopefully change someone’s life as much as it did mine.


What’s your favorite thing about rowing?

Chaos in the last 500m of a 2k, unrelenting power and fury during a sprint sequence, ‘rage strokes’.


What’s your least favorite thing about rowing?

6ks.


What’s your favorite thing to do with your free time? Any summer adventures planned?

Since I stopped rowing, I have picked up Rugby and run into people full steam without pads on. Besides that I am an avid hiker and cyclist and love getting out into nature whenever possible, regardless of weather. This summer I will be enjoying mild Seattle weather and hopefully getting some backpacking in!


What do you think the most important thing you’ve learned from rowing is?

The ability to work with other people towards a unified goal, despite having differences. Rowing is beautiful in that sense, because you don’t see that kind of cohesion very often in the real world. Whether or not you agree with someone, you are still in the same boat as them and you have to trust in them, just as they have to trust in you. If you aren’t able to do this, you probably won’t go fast and will quickly learn the concept of teamwork and treating people with respect.


Daniel Rowbotham – Pocock Rowing Center – Office Intern


Give us your life story in no more than 2 sentences.

I grew up as a long haired skater kid in the small town of Lake Forest Park Washington until I found rowing the spring of my sophomore year of High school. Since then I’ve been in a semi-passionate love affair with the erg and a future bachelors of marketing degree at Syracuse University.


What brought you to the George Pocock Foundation?

My involvement with rowing the past 5 years has been a constant and when it came to getting a summer internship for school, working at the Pocock Foundation was a no-brainer. Rowing changed my life in a huge way and the thought that my involvement in a cause like this could do the same for another is an awesome feeling.


What’s your favorite thing about rowing?

My favorite thing about rowing would have to be the feelings that accompany it. They differ greatly from day to day and season to season but they remain constant at the same time. The pride of completing something from your personal agenda, the frustration of a loss, the camaraderie  felt between teammates, these feelings are consistent and make the sport incredibly special. I could not begin to count how many kilometers I have rowed throughout my career but, without fail, the feeling of accomplishment is felt after every piece.


What’s your least favorite thing about rowing?

My least favorite part about rowing would have to be the frustration that accompanies the process. Not figuring out how to make a change or not seeing hard work pay off is incredibly frustrating and, as every rower can attest to, is what sometimes makes you question your involvement. This sport is difficult but those difficulties and how you deal with those difficulties are what defines you as a rower and a person.


What’s your favorite thing to do with your free time? Any summer adventures planned?

My free time is usually filled with hiking, biking, skateboarding, tennis, and other outdoorsy activities. I’m usually spending time with my lovely family, my brother Sam, and group of close friends. In terms of adventures, nothing too crazy has been planned. I am headed to Leavenworth soon to go on a paddle boarding trip and then possibly some weekends away camping. There’s always Pokemon Go to keep me on my toes.


What do you think the most important thing you’ve learned from rowing is?

Resiliency. Whether it’s emotional or physical, the ability to get beaten to the ground and get back up with determination and a stupid grin on your face is an incredibly useful skill that I have carried with me. Life is just a big series of ups and downs and how you deal with the low points make the high points that much better.


Kam Coon – Renton Rowing Center – Office Intern


Give us your life story in no more than 2 sentences.

I grew up in Auburn, WA competing in track and swimming and before walking on to the WSU rowing team and making it to the NCAA Championship 3 years in a row. In addition to rowing with the Cougars, I earned my degree in Kinesiology and a minor in Spanish.


What brought you to the Pocock Foundation?

It was close to home and I have aspirations of being an awesome rowing coach someday!


What’s your favorite thing to do with your free time? Any summer adventures planned?

Watch movies, read, hike, camp, penny board, cook, learn. Taking a trip back to Pullman, Go Cougs!


What’s your favorite thing about rowing?

The rhythm and going fast. The feeling in a boat is indescribable when you are with people who desire something equally as bad as you and are willing to put every inch and every last drop into achieving that. Rowers are great, whole-hearted people.  


What’s your least favorite thing about rowing?

The sometimes cold weather, I like being warm.  


What do you think the most important thing you’ve learned from rowing is?

No matter what happens to you, your fate can always be changed. Put forth your efforts, hard work, and focus, on the goals you set. If you believe, you will achieve! 

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Seattle, WA 98102

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Tel: (206) 403-1195

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